Papers for the month of September 2019


Dresang, Haley C., Dickey, Michael Walsh, & Warren, Tessa

"Semantic memory for objects, actions, and events: A novel test of event-related conceptual semantic knowledge"
Cognitive Neuropsychology, :

Mouse over here for a brief summary or click to open article in a new tab.http://This study presents and tests a novel measure of event semantic memory in unimpaired adults across the lifespan and a sample of stroke survivors with aphasia. Findings suggest that the novel measure can be used to detect the presence and impact of event knowledge impairments in neurological conditions.


Ameya Nanivadekar, Christopher Ayers, Robert Gaunt, Douglas Weber

"Selectivity of afferent microstimulation at the DRG using epineural and penetrating electrode arrays"
Journal of Neural Engineering, epub:epub

Mouse over here for a brief summary or click to open article in a new tab.Previous work from our lab has demonstrated that microstimulation via penetrating electrodes in the dorsal root ganglia is an effective means of restoring sensory feedback in animal models, although clinical translation of these techniques remains challenging. In this study, we demonstrate the stimulation through electrodes that sit on the surface of the DRG and do not penetrate the epineurium is nearly as selective as microstimulation via penetrating electrodes. Epineural stimulation is far more amenable to clinical translation for neuroprosthetic applications.


Popov, V., Reder, L.

"Frequency effects on memory: A resource-limited theory"
Psychological Review, Advance Online Publication:1-47

Mouse over here for a brief summary or click to open article in a new tab.We present a review of frequency effects in memory, accompanied by a theory of memory, according to which the storage of new information in long-term memory depletes a limited pool of working memory resources as an inverse function of item strength. These resources recover gradually over time. A computational model that implements the theory is presented, which accounts for a wide array of existing and novel findings.


Cannady, M.A., Chung, J.M., & Vincent-Ruz, P.

"Scientific sensemaking supports science content learning across disciplines and instructional contexts"
Contemporary Educational Psychology, 59:1-15

Mouse over here for a brief summary or click to open article in a new tab.Science consists of a body of knowledge and a set of processes by which the knowledge is produced. Although these have traditionally been treated separately in science instruction, there has been a shift to an integration of knowledge and processes, or set of practices, in how science should be taught and assessed. We explore whether a general overall mastery of the processes drives learning in new science content areas and if this overall mastery can be improved through engaged science learning. Through a review of literature, the paper conceptualizes this general process mastery as scientific sensemaking, defines the sub-dimensions, and presents a new measure of the construct centered in scenarios of general interest to young adolescents. Using a dataset involving over 2500 6th and 8th grade students, the paper shows that scientific sensemaking scores can predict content learning gains and that this relationship is consistent across student characteristics, content of instruction, and classroom environment. Further, students who are behaviorally and cognitively engaged during science classroom activities show greater growth in scientific sensemaking, showing a reciprocal relationship between sensemaking ability and effective science instruction. Findings from this work support early instruction on sensemaking activities to better position students to learn new scientific content.


Acar, Katerina, Kiorpes, Lynne, Movshon, Tony

"Altered functional interactions between neurons in primary visual cortex of macaque monkeys with experimental amblyopia"
Journal of Neurophysiology, 0:0

Mouse over here for a brief summary or click to open article in a new tab.In this study, we found changes in the strength and pattern of shared response variability between neurons in visual cortex in amblyopia. These changes in neuronal interactions could impair the visual representations of V1 populations driven by the amblyopic eye, resulting in degraded visual perception.


Rice, Caitlin

"A REVIEW OF LABORATORY STUDIES OF ADULT SECOND LANGUAGE VOCABULARY TRAINING"
Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 0:0

Mouse over here for a brief summary or click to open article in a new tab.This review article examines and integrates studies of second language (L2) vocabulary instruction with adult learners in a laboratory setting, using a framework provided by a modified version of the Revised Hierarchical Model (Kroll & Stewart, 1994), the Revised Hierarchical Model-Repetition Elaboration Retrieval. By examining how various training methods promote or fail to promote the development of high-quality orthographic, phonological, and meaning representations, and strong connections between these representations, we reconceptualize the current body of knowledge, and highlight gaps in the existing literature.


Rice, C

"State of the scholarship: A review of laboratory studies of adult second language vocabulary training"
Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 00:1-32

Mouse over here for a brief summary or click to open article in a new tab.A review of laboratory studies of adult second language vocabulary training


Rice, Caitlin

"A review of laboratory studies of adult second language vocabulary training"
Studies in Second Language Acquisition, online:x

Mouse over here for a brief summary or click to open article in a new tab.A comprehensive review of second language vocabulary training methods including a new model for second language vocabulary learning.


Hsu, A

"B-SOiD: An Open Source Unsupervised Algorithm for Discovery of Spontaneous Behaviors"
bioRxiv, 0:770271

Mouse over here for a brief summary or click to open article in a new tab.We provide an easy to use software package to extract actions from sponteanous behavior (grooming, locomotion, rearing, walking, etc). Can also be used in birds, monkeys, humans. Provides action classification using an unbiased, unsupervised algorithm with millisecond resolution

Archive:

  • 2019
  • 2018
  • 2017
  • 2016
  • 2015
  • 2014
  • 2013